Blog Archives

Brexit, Trump and the Implications for Development- A Review

by Laura Bennett Given the events that continue to dominate world politics, I was only too eager to attend the talk entitled ‘Brexit, Trump and the Implications for Development’, featuring a very diverse range of speakers. The discussion was chaired

Posted in Uncategorized

Liberia, Ebola and the Pitfalls of State-building

by Priska Dibiasi The Sussex Africa Centre and the Institute of Development Studies recently invited Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey from the University of Oxford to discuss her latest research at a joint event. She presented her findings at the event entitled

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Posted in Ebola, Global Health, International Relations, Uncategorized

Anthropology between Europe and the Pacific: Values and Prospects for a Relationship Beyond Relativism

by Laura Bennett, MA Human Rights As part of the School of Global Studies Anthropology seminar series, I recently went along to hear Joel Robbins, a Social Anthropology professor at Cambridge, discuss his research entitled ‘Anthropology between Europe and the

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Posted in Ethnography, Rights

Proving Torture

Demanding the impossible- Home Office mistreatment of expert medical evidence by Rosa Jones Empathy is a complex emotion. It is not always readily elicited when the matter in concern is torture. The subject disturbs our natural sense of justice to

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Posted in Policy, Rights, Torture, Uncategorized

Black holes and revelations

Global Studies alum Pip Roddis, a youth delegate to the UN climate talks in Marrakesh (COP22), reflects on the first week of the negotiations. Despite frustrations about the slow nature of the talks, Pip reminds us that climate action also takes

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Posted in Alumni, Climate, Climate Change, Policy

Global Eyecare Workshop Discusses The Future of Eyecare Provision

by Lora Cracknell According to the World Health Organisation, 285 million people are estimated to be visually impaired worldwide; 39 million of these are fully blind. This past month, Sussex DevSoc, in collaboration with the School of Global Studies, hosted

Posted in Global Health, Health

Britain is right to celebrate the abolition of slavery, but must acknowledge excesses of empire

As the UK celebrates its role in the abolition of the slave trade in 1807, it’s important to recognise that Britain’s humanitarianism was ultimately cut from the same cloth as imperial expansion. by Alan Lester Britain’s Anti-Slavery Day should remind

Posted in Uncategorized

Unearthing the senses in our experience of woodlands

by Karis Jade Petty This blog post originally appeared on the Woodland Trust News and Blog. Have you ever stood in a woodland and closed your eyes, even for a few moments? Could you hear the rummaging of the squirrel,

Posted in Uncategorized

Risk, Property, and the Politics of Nature

Last year, the School of Global Studies (through the Centre for Global Political Economy), in conjunction with the ESRC STEPS Centre, held a conference on the Financialisation of Nature. The conference produced some exciting and thought-provoking dialogue on this important

Posted in Uncategorized

Wildlife or domestic animals?

Last year, the School of Global Studies (through the Centre for Global Political Economy), in conjunction with the ESRC STEPS Centre, held a conference on the Financialisation of Nature. The conference produced some exciting and thought-provoking dialogue on this important

Posted in Uncategorized