Library Show & Tell

The Innovation Group hosted the second Library Show & Tell event in the Barlow Gallery. Staff from across the Library and The Keep presented wonderful examples of their work, and a grand time was had by all! Look out for links in the photos…

Brighton winter palace
Andrew Bennett showcased the Unbuilt Brighton project
Proposed summer and winter palace, situated on Kings Road to the west of the West Pier, c1910 (ACC 2791/8/1)
Including some fascinating images of Brighton architectural features that never quite got made...
Unbuilt Brighton
Collection Development
Elaine busting out the moves!
Ed & Mike take a virtual tour of the BLDS
Catrina's Open Access demo
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Click on laptop links
LATS are in Kahoots!

Rachel, Claire and Helen demonstrated Kahoots and PollEverywhere

Heading layer

Samira showed us the German Jewish collections site

Phil glimpsed the future...
Book Sprint
Thanks also go to:

...and HUGE thanks go to Lindsay, Jade, Kerry and Ed for organising the Show & Tell!

Adam Harwood on SURE
Tim Graves on Fusion Charts
Doug Broadbent-Yale on e-textbooks
Gavin Byman on digitisation
Beth Logan on Hive Scholars
Ed Hogan on virtual tours
and all who participated...

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Book Sandwiches

by Clare Playforth

bookshelves

 

Classification is a big part of my job and certainly the part that I find most enjoyable and challenging. The other day I was looking in vain for a resource that would provide me with a table of ‘date letters’ that are sometimes used when classifying collected works. After a couple of discussions about this it became clear to me that there are many practices in cataloguing and classification that might seem like they are needlessly complicated and opaque. I want to explain that there is a reason for things to be done this way.

Every time we make a decision about how to classify something we are doing it with the collection and ultimately the user in mind. When someone has looked up a book on the catalogue we want them to be able to find it easily on the shelf, but when they get to that shelf we also want them to find a load of other books that are relevant on either side i.e. we want to enable browsing. We want them to arrive at the shelf and first find the general books about a topic and then to be able to walk down that stack seeing how the subject narrows and becomes more specific as the classifications are expanded. In an ideal world we would want each classmark to represent only one book – this is part of the reason for doing the reclassification projects which you can read about here.

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