Blog Archives

Grouping by attainment in schools: can psychological interventions help turbo-charge poor students’ performance?

By Ian Hadden Last month I attended the impressive – and buzzy – sell-out researchED 2018 annual conference in London. The highlight for me was a fascinating piece of research presented by Becky Francis and Jeremy Hodgen of the UCL Institute

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Posted in PhD research, Research

Keep calm and manage impulsivity

By Aleksandra Herman Have you ever gone grocery shopping to get some bread and milk, and you found yourself leaving the shop with a bag full of items that you never intended (and needed) to buy? Or maybe you’ve committed

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Posted in PhD research, Research

Depression and Cognitive Ageing

By Amber John Depression is a common mental health problem which is experienced by people of all ages. It is estimated that each year around 1 in 5 people in the UK will experience depressive symptoms. Depression encompasses lots of

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Posted in PhD research, Research

The dangers of over-hyping ‘sugar addiction’.

By Jenny Morris   Sugar seems to be frequently vilified in the media. Just a quick google search and headlines report ‘Sugar can destroy your brain’, ‘Sugar is as addictive as cocaine’ and ‘Sugar addiction ‘should be treated as a form of drug abuse’.

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Posted in PhD research, Research

Why do bystanders justify the use of violence by protesters?

By Patricio Saavedra Morales Recently, the UN Human Rights Office published an extensive report about human rights violations and abuses during protests occurring in Venezuela from 1st of April to 31st July 2017.  In the document, UN officers accused the Venezuelan police force of

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My Colourful JRA

By Katie Barnes Even before coming to Sussex, I was aware of the work being done by the Sussex Colour Group and knew that I would love to be involved in some colourful projects one day. The JRA enabled me

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Posted in Uncategorized, Undergraduate research

The social psychology of the Hajj

By John Drury Last week, the annual Hajj took place in Mecca (Makkah) and the other holy places nearby. This Muslim pilgrimage is one of the world’s largest crowd events – the official figure for those attending last year was

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Posted in PhD research, Research, Uncategorized

How do street actions strengthen social movements?

By Dr John Drury There is evidence that recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia, which saw a mass mobilization of white supremacists, Ku Klux Klan, and Nazis have served to embolden and strengthen these groups, who are now ‘bursting with confidence’.

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Posted in Faculty research, Research

Emergent social identities in a flood: Implications for community psychosocial resilience

By Evangelos Ntontis. Recently, the small village of Coverack in Cornwall was hit by a flash flood which resulted in damaged properties and possessions, closed roads, disruption, and required the rescue of several people. This was not a one-off event. Flooding is

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Surviving or Thriving? Lifelong mental health in children with chronic physical illness

Chronic physical illness affects large numbers of children and families. Worldwide, 1 in 5 children has a chronic physical illness, including arthritis, asthma, cancer, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, type-1 diabetes, and epilepsy. With the advances of

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