Blog Archives

Why do bystanders justify the use of violence by protesters?

By Patricio Saavedra Morales Recently, the UN Human Rights Office published an extensive report about human rights violations and abuses during protests occurring in Venezuela from 1st of April to 31st July 2017.  In the document, UN officers accused the Venezuelan police force of

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Posted in PhD research, Research

My Colourful JRA

By Katie Barnes Even before coming to Sussex, I was aware of the work being done by the Sussex Colour Group and knew that I would love to be involved in some colourful projects one day. The JRA enabled me

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Posted in Uncategorized, Undergraduate research

The social psychology of the Hajj

By John Drury Last week, the annual Hajj took place in Mecca (Makkah) and the other holy places nearby. This Muslim pilgrimage is one of the world’s largest crowd events – the official figure for those attending last year was

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How do street actions strengthen social movements?

By Dr John Drury There is evidence that recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia, which saw a mass mobilization of white supremacists, Ku Klux Klan, and Nazis have served to embolden and strengthen these groups, who are now ‘bursting with confidence’.

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Posted in Faculty research, Research

Emergent social identities in a flood: Implications for community psychosocial resilience

By Evangelos Ntontis. Recently, the small village of Coverack in Cornwall was hit by a flash flood which resulted in damaged properties and possessions, closed roads, disruption, and required the rescue of several people. This was not a one-off event. Flooding is

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Surviving or Thriving? Lifelong mental health in children with chronic physical illness

Chronic physical illness affects large numbers of children and families. Worldwide, 1 in 5 children has a chronic physical illness, including arthritis, asthma, cancer, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, type-1 diabetes, and epilepsy. With the advances of

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King Lab goes to Westminster

By Dr Sarah King Last Tuesday was Posters in Parliament, a day organised by the British Conference of Undergraduate Research, to allow students to visit Westminster and present their research to Members of Parliament.  Robert Tempelaar, who spent the summer working

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Life as a postdoc – 10 things to consider

By Dr Christiane Oedekoven   I am currently working as a postdoc in Chris Bird’s Episodic Memory Lab after doing my first postdoc in Tuebingen, in a more clinical setting. Of course, every lab is different, and obviously not everyone

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Thesis Boot Camp

By Molly Berenhaus Right before the holiday season, I decided to attend the doctoral school’s Thesis Boot Camp and was pleasantly surprised by how much I accomplished and learned. One limitation was that the writing workshops mostly catered to the

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JRA Memories

By George Britton   Once I found out that I got the JRA award, I found myself explaining what the scheme is, and what I was going to do, to countless people.  The reality of the project is only sinking

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