Blog Archives

Victims or Empowered Citizens: Moving Beyond the Traditional Humanitarian Aid Model

This post was written by Shonali Banerjee, Doctoral Researcher in International Development, University of Sussex.  As global humanitarian crises get broader, more complicated and more urgent, it’s critical to evaluate the current aid models and how they might be improved.

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Posted in Anthropology, International Relations, migration, Rights

Brexit, Trump and the Implications for Development- A Review

by Laura Bennett Given the events that continue to dominate world politics, I was only too eager to attend the talk entitled ‘Brexit, Trump and the Implications for Development’, featuring a very diverse range of speakers. The discussion was chaired

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Posted in International Relations, Policy

Liberia, Ebola and the Pitfalls of State-building

by Priska Dibiasi The Sussex Africa Centre and the Institute of Development Studies recently invited Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey from the University of Oxford to discuss her latest research at a joint event. She presented her findings at the event

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Posted in Global Health, International Relations

Britain is Right to Celebrate the Abolition of Slavery, But Must Acknowledge Excesses of Empire

by Alan Lester As the UK celebrates its role in the abolition of the slave trade in 1807, it’s important to recognise that Britain’s humanitarianism was ultimately cut from the same cloth as imperial expansion. Britain’s Anti-Slavery Day should remind us

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Posted in International Relations, Rights

Time to Throw out the Balance Sheet

by Alan Lester A bit of a departure from our standard project blog, this essay responds to the latest rehashing of the British Empire in the media (The Rhodes statue debate and a YouGov poll have both made the British

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Posted in Economy, International Relations, Rights