The Brighton Global Health and Development Community: A Case of Timing

The breadth of Global Health in its most conceptual sense, is a spectrum that encompasses every facet of human existence. Amidst the capricious complexities that come with a twenty-first century globalised world, it is our state of health and wellbeing that provides us with a powerful sense of connection and common humanity. To achieve Global Health’s ever-growing ambitions, no one or group can be excluded, however, as the discipline continues to evolve, some of its key proponents remain rooted in the conventional praxis of healthcare and development, often to the detriment of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Global Health, Health

Brexit, Trump and the Implications for Development- A Review

by Laura Bennett

Given the events that continue to dominate world politics, I was only too eager to attend the talk entitled ‘Brexit, Trump and the Implications for Development’, featuring a very diverse range of speakers. The discussion was chaired by Simon Maxwell, an emeritus fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS). The panel itself consisted of: Michael Anderson, Centre for Global Development; Priya Deshingkar, Research Director, Migrating out of Poverty Research Consortium, University of Sussex; Peter Kyle MP, Member of Parliament for Hove and Portslade (Labour); Clionadh Raleigh, Professor Of Human Geography, School of Global Studies, University of Sussex.

Read more ›

Tagged with: ,
Posted in International Relations, Policy

Liberia, Ebola and the Pitfalls of State-building

by Priska Dibiasi

The Sussex Africa Centre and the Institute of Development Studies recently invited Dr Robtel Neajai Pailey from the University of Oxford to discuss her latest research at a joint event. She presented her findings at the event entitled “Liberia, Ebola, and the Pitfalls of State-building: Reimagining Public Authority ‘Inside’ and ‘Outside the Post-war State”.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Global Health, International Relations

Anthropology Between Europe and the Pacific: Values and Prospects for a Relationship Beyond Relativism

by Laura Bennett

As part of the School of Global Studies Anthropology seminar series, I recently went along to hear Joel Robbins, a Social Anthropology professor at Cambridge, discuss his research entitled ‘Anthropology between Europe and the Pacific: Values and Prospects for a Relationship Beyond Relativism’. The general focus of the seminar was values, how they are used and what meaning they have to different people from different places. This discussion was encapsulated in the larger idea of the role of anthropology in communications and understandings of sameness and differences between places.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Ethnography, Rights

Proving Torture

by Rosa Jones

Empathy is a complex emotion. It is not always readily elicited when the matter in concern is torture. The subject disturbs our natural sense of justice to the point that most will want to shield themselves from the details. It challenges us emotionally, to look someone in the eye and know that they have experienced the most horrific action that one human can inflict on another, and that this experience now exists in their memory to be relived relentlessly. But it is becoming increasingly apparent in my work with Freedom from Torture, that it is the role of empathy, in conjunction with professionalism and determination, that will make change happen.

Read more ›

Tagged with:
Posted in Policy, Rights, Torture