‘♪ Getting to know you… ♪’

 

Welcome to a new series of blog posts about ‘♪ getting to know you… ♪’, our fantastic University of Sussex Library staff.

First up we have Amy and Maria – a big thanks to them for being the first to take part.

We’d love for this to be a regular feature and so if you’d like to answer the Q+A’s for the blog, please get in touch with the blog admins – Sam, Kate or Kerry.

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Karl Marx and The Jewish Question through the eyes of Julius Carlebach

by Morwenna Silver

Morwenna Silver volunteered at The Keep last year, helping to catalogue the donation of Julius Carlebach’s papers to the German-Jewish Archive. Here she writes about Carlebach’s reading of Marx, what constitutes antisemitism, and the power of language in a politically unstable culture.

More info on the Carlebach collection can be found on The Keep’s website:

http://www.thekeep.info/collections/getrecord/GB181_SxMs92

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Julius Carlebach had the most extraordinary life. Born in Hamburg in 1922, he and his sister escaped the Nazis via the Kindertransport. He was a sailor in the Royal Navy, and went on to manage a Jewish orphanage in Norwood in South London and then served as a rabbi in Kenya. Also an accomplished academic, he was a research student at the University of Cambridge, and taught at the University of Bristol before he eventually became Associate Professor of Sociology and Israel studies at the University of Sussex.  A vast collection of Carlebach’s correspondence, academic papers and research notes has recently been donated to the German-Jewish Archive at The Keep by Carlebach’s family. Continue reading

Library Green Group

by Tom Mountford

 

“Say hello to your local eco-warriors!”

As I’m sure you’re all aware, environmental issues are very much a pressing matter in the world at the moment and (as any institution should) Sussex is pushing for better practices from its staff and students to help reduce its green footprint. With that in mind the Library Green Group has been formed to us here at the library do our bit.

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UKeiG 2018: Libraries of the Future

by Nicholas Heavey

I recently went to CILIP HQ to attend UKeiG 2018 Members’ Day to find out what is going on in the world of Geographic Information Systems, Smart Campuses and Intelligent Libraries, CILIP’s Privacy Project and how libraries and Wikimedia can work together. As it was my first library conference, I was interested to see what was going on in the information world and who exactly was in it. In attendance were information professionals from the NHS and the Home Office through to publishers and local libraries. The day offered up a feast of new ideas and I left feeling enthused about potential future projects. Below you will find information about some of the topics and ideas discussed on the day, as well as some useful links for anyone interested in finding out more.

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UKeiG 2018: Libraries of the Future

Turkish Delights (Rahat Lokum) Flavour Six: Special Collections and Metadata (…Mastic?)

By Philip Keates

No, I didn’t know what mastic was either. And on looking it up, I’m not sure I trust a spice that can also be used in varnishing. But apparently it’s a classic flavour in Eastern Mediterranean cooking. Cooking tips and librarianship – this blog series really has it all.

Anyway, in this last post (aww…), we’ll be looking at description and discovery of resources, as well as at some of the more unusual resources themselves, as held in archives and special collections.

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National Libraries Week guest blog post: What happens after a disaster? The Grenfell fire and the campaign for justice

by John Drury and Selin Tekin Guven, with an introduction by Katy Stoddard

 

Introduction

Our dual themes for National Libraries Week here at Sussex are wellbeing and community. This guest blogpost, from School of Psychology reader John Drury and PhD student Selin Tekin Guven, touches on both, discussing the way in which communities come together in the wake of a disaster not only for support but to campaign for justice and social change.

Check out the other special events happening in the Library this week, including mindfulness sessions and a board games café, and have a go at our Book Face Competition on Twitter or Instagram.   

Katy Stoddard

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These theses trees

by Clare Playforth

Those of you who enjoyed my last post on sandwiches but felt like you wanted it to be longer and even more niche (lol) then read on, this one is for you! It’s an article originally titled Subject Indexing in an Institutional Repository that I had accepted for publication by Catalogue and Index – periodical of the Cataloguing and Indexing Group, a Special Interest Group of CILIP.

I’ve been a cataloguer for some years but have only just started training to become an indexer with the Society of Indexers. I can now see that there are many parallels between cataloguing and indexing and I am often expanding my knowledge of one activity through the other. The clearest example of a task in which the two areas are intertwined is when I classify theses in our institutional repository. Our current repository platform is EPrints using the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set. This allows us to assign subjects to research outputs so that they are indexed and available to users through access points in our discovery layer (Primo). I’m going to avoid discussion about the systems involved here and their interaction with each other and am going to focus on the details of this task and try to understand some of the benefits and flaws of the current workflow.

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San Francisco adventures and visiting Gleeson Library

by Gemma Price

I visited San Francisco in August 2015. This post is about that trip and exploring the city. I’ll also talk about a visit to University of San Francisco’s Gleeson Library.

There were many highlights to my time in San Francisco.
The locals had lots of friendly open conversations with us.
It was good to walk around the neighbourhoods, wandering and exploring. It led to finding interesting buildings and independent cafes and shops.
The city felt modern but with many nods to the past, such as the traditional architecture. There were also plenty of tourist areas and modern shops.
A vivid memory of the trip was the intense heat- often most intense whilst walking up the steep streets. Luckily Brighton is steep in most directions so it wasn’t too much of a shock! Being there felt (despite the heat) like a breath of fresh air.

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